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      02-20-2020, 02:04 PM   #28
mkoesel
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Drives: No BMW for now
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Canton, MI

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Bread View Post
I don't know. We had one car for many years, I rode a bike and took public transit. My wife's next car will almost certainly be an EV and there's probably a greater than average chance that mine will be too.
Exactly. So you see my point. Even as someone who's willing to make some compromises, you are saying its still not a lock that you are getting an EV. When you look at the larger market and extrapolate across what we know to be true about ourselves - creatures of habit, the human tendency of being unwilling to bend - it's pretty clear that it's not going to happen without more work. The EV needs to be able to do what the ICE can do. Otherwise, the vast majority of the population isn't getting on board. To me this is pretty clearly explains today's EV/ICE split.

Quote:
As for EV proliferation, my little culdesac has about forty houses, so let's call it 85 cars. At last count 15 of those are EV's and I think of the last five new cars, three were EV's. Just running an errand this morning, I would guess 20% of what I saw were EV's and another large share were hybrids. There are areas that have a very heavy adoption rate, just because you're not in one doesn't mean that you've got the entire market sussed out.
It's under 2% in the US. That's the facts. No need to extrapolate anything. And most of that is still on the coasts. Are the numbers going up? Sure. But a mass exodus isn't happening yet, and to me it's not hard to see why. And that's despite that I've been driving my EV with its modest 115mi range (but only 70 miles in the winter, mind you) for well over a year now.

And FWIW, I spend much of my time in one of the most liberal cities in the midwest, and EVs are pretty darn common in these parts, relatively speaking. That's despite the extremely heavy Big Three influence/bias (only GM has an EV), the anti-Tesla attitude in the state, and a general love for high performance gas-sucking automobiles. So, I know that plenty of people are buying them. It doesn't change the fact that most people aren't, and that there are perfectly valid reasons as to why they aren't.